Category Archive Mindfulness

ByAnxious Minds

A Touch Of Mindfulness

I’m one of the worlds biggest worriers. Often worrying about things I can’t control and worrying about my loved ones as they carry on with their lives without a care in the world. The part of my body that feels these stresses the most is my neck and shoulder area so I do a lot of yoga to try to counter the pain.

While yoga is pain relieving and de-stressing for the time I’m doing it, I really needed to find a way to relax my mind and my body for as much of the day as I could while just getting on with life. A friend put me on to a meditation class and as part of it the tutor taught us a thing or two about mindfulness.

Now I’m guessing that most of you would have heard of mindfulness before but probably not all of you would have tried it. Just to explain the term: Mindfulness is a form of meditation that you achieve from concentrating on your breath for long enough so that you stop acting on your thoughts.

In other words, thoughts come in and out of your mind but you simply observe them from an objective viewpoint. You don’t judge them or plan to do anything about them – you just let them be.

So imagine a negative thought coming into your mind, you are able to let it float straight back out as if it were a cloud knowing you can deal with that thought at a later time.

With enough practice – and I’m warning you now it takes a lot of practice – you then learn to be in control of thoughts rather them controlling you and bringing on stress and anxiety.

Let me list some of the benefits mindfulness can give you, once you’ve learned to do it properly.

This list isn’t exhaustive, neither can I vouch for them all as my experience isn’t that vast. But here goes … Mindfulness:

• Decreases stress, depression, anxiety and irritability
• Prevents feelings of exhaustion
• Reduces how emotional you become when in pain
• Reduces pain
• Improves mood
• Improves memory
• Is good for anger management

As I said, these are just a few things but they’ll do for a start, right?

At this stage I should say that lots of clinical research has been undertaken over the years into the benefits of mindfulness. If you’re considering giving it a go or really taking to mindfulness in a serious way, you might like to do a little research into it yourself. Perhaps find a class like I did.

So now on to my experience of mindfulness. My instructor, who was very knowledgeable and offered his classes for free, led us through some guided meditation. What that means is someone is giving you prompts to get you to a state of relaxation and then to a state of mindfulness.

Firstly, you are guided to look at your breath and concentrate solely on your breathing. In doing that you are guided to relax all parts of your body one by one. If you feel any parts tensing up again you focus your breath on those parts and the tension should ease away. The instructor stops talking, you feel completely relaxed and from here your only concern is the pattern of your breathing. Naturally, thoughts will come into your mind but in time you learn to allow them to float out again. And that is the start of achieving mindfulness.

One exercise we were given was to try using mindfulness as we go about doing simple day to day tasks. For example, if you’re making your first cup of tea of the morning, instead of thinking about the stack of ironing in the basket, the weeds outgrowing the roses in the garden, the fact that your boss has put you on lates again or whether you’ll get a report out in time at work, you solely concentrate on the process in hand. For example: Fill the kettle and think of nothing else. Put the bag in the cup and push the picture of the linen basket out of your mind – and so on. You get the idea.

I did manage to do this quite well at one stage and I have to say that I found it calming. I only wish I had carried on. Especially on a week like this when there have been a few upsets around me and, without a coping strategy, I can feel the tension building in my shoulders again. Maybe it’s time to allow a touch of mindfulness back into my life. In fact we could all do with some couldn’t we?

ByAnxious Minds

Mindfulness meditation and the immune system

While mindfulness meditation can have tremendous effects on the mind and the heart, it can also greatly influence the body in a physical way. In some cases, mind really is over matter, and more and more studies are now managing to prove that. For many researchers, the mind could have this wonderful power of having an effect on health. That being said, the effect can be positive as much as negative.

You probably must have heard about the negative effects the mind can trigger on one’s health, for example through the consequences of chronic stress and anxiety. Indeed, it is now well known that stress can be the cause of sleeping issues – themselves causing a whole lot of new negative physical effects –, digestive problems, muscular trouble and even some forms of cancer in the long run.


Now, what you may not be aware of is that the mind, notably thanks to the processes of positive thinking and mindful meditation, can also cure the body, can also improve the health when the body is sick. Recently, a group of Canadian researchers led by Dr. Linda E. Carlson discovered that mindfulness meditation and support groups – in which positive thinking is very often practiced and experienced with other patients – are associated with preserved telomere length.


As we dig into scientific terms, let us quickly define what a telomere is (I have to admit here I myself had no idea before I actually did some research for the sake of this article). Well, a telomere is something that prevents the chromosomes from deteriorating, they keep them in a sort of ‘good health’. They are part of the DNA, stretches of it more exactly, and cap the chromosomes to protect them. If the telomeres happen to shorten prematurely, conditions like diabetes, heart disease and cancer are very likely to develop. Indeed, scientists had previously discovered that people dying from ‘old age’ were actually dying from the shortening, the wearing down of the telomeres, causing exhaustion of the stem-cells.


Let us come back to our main topic now: how can mindfulness meditation can help keeping the telomeres long? How did the scientists find that out? A study was conducted on 88 women who were breast cancer survivors. These women were divided in three groups: one group practicing mindfulness meditation and yoga for eight weeks, one group assigned to twelve weeks of group therapy, and one group receiving a six-hour stress management course. Of course, the telomeres were measured before and after the study. At the end of the project, results showed that while the first group roughly kept the same telomeres length, the latter shortened in the third group.

In addition, Dr. Carlson stated that “generally healthy people I a work-based mindfulness stress reduction program have been shown to produce higher antibody titers to the flu vaccine than controls, and there has been promising work looking at the effect of mindfulness in HIV and diabetes”. There are several good news in that statement. First you do not need to be sick to experience the benefits of mindfulness meditation physically, on your body. Indeed, what is implied in Dr. Carlson’s statement is that this type of meditation could strengthen the immune system of persons in generally good health. Then, mindfulness meditation could prove to help HIV and diabetes patients in the fight against their illness.


Twenty years ago, a group of scientists from the Department of Medicine of the Ulleval University Hospital in Oslo (Norway) had already managed to prove that mindfulness meditation could be a way to improve the quality of the immune system, especially after the body had been put through a strenuous physical stress. To conduct their study, they used a panel of twelve males running regularly and taking part in at least one competition over 10 kilometers every year. Half of the group practiced meditation, while the other half did not. You may ask now why use men exercising regularly, as we might assume they are in better health than the average population. Well, intense physical training may actually be responsible for a decrease of the normal immune response when the body is facing infectious agents. As a matter of fact, infection susceptibility tends to be higher among athletes compared to the rest of the population. The thinking pattern of the researchers was the following: if stress, physical in that case, could be the trigger of a poorer immune response, stress management and reduction, through meditation, could well be the solution to bring the immune system up again.


What mindfulness meditation is actually doing is that it is modifying the response of the immune system when exposed to intense physical stress. In other words, what happens is not that the immune system is brought down after the effort and then brought up again thanks to meditation, but the meditation actually suppresses the decrease of the immune response.


Further studies still need to be conducted in the years to come to confirm these first theories, and the good news is that the scientific community seems to be taking a particular interest in the topic. This is yet another great example of what the mind can achieve when you put it to work. If we become fully able to prevent illnesses, or to slow their growth (in the case of HIV for instance) when they are already there then truly, anything is possible.

ByAnxious Minds

A Touch Of Mindfulness

I’m one of the worlds biggest worriers. Often worrying about things I can’t control and worrying about my loved ones as they carry on with their lives without a care in the world. The part of my body that feels these stresses the most is my neck and shoulder area so I do a lot of yoga to try to counter the pain.

While yoga is pain relieving and de-stressing for the time I’m doing it, I really needed to find a way to relax my mind and my body for as much of the day as I could while just getting on with life. A friend put me on to a meditation class and as part of it the tutor taught us a thing or two about mindfulness.

Now I’m guessing that most of you would have heard of mindfulness before but probably not all of you would have tried it. Just to explain the term: Mindfulness is a form of meditation that you achieve from concentrating on your breath for long enough so that you stop acting on your thoughts. In other words, thoughts come in and out of your mind but you simply observe them from an objective viewpoint. You don’t judge them or plan to do anything about them – you just let them be. So imagine a negative thought coming into your mind, you are able to let it float straight back out as if it were a cloud knowing you can deal with that thought at a later time.

With enough practice – and I’m warning you now it takes a lot of practice – you then learn to be in control of thoughts rather them controlling you and bringing on stress and anxiety.

Let me list some of the benefits mindfulness can give you, once you’ve learned to do it properly.

This list isn’t exhaustive, neither can I vouch for them all as my experience isn’t that vast. But here goes … Mindfulness:

• Decreases stress, depression, anxiety and irritability
• Prevents feelings of exhaustion
• Reduces how emotional you become when in pain
• Reduces pain
• Improves mood
• Improves memory
• Is good for anger management

As I said, these are just a few things but they’ll do for a start, right?

At this stage I should say that lots of clinical research has been undertaken over the years into the benefits of mindfulness. If you’re considering giving it a go or really taking to mindfulness in a serious way, you might like to do a little research into it yourself. Perhaps find a class like I did.

So now on to my experience of mindfulness. My instructor, who was very knowledgeable and offered his classes for free, led us through some guided meditation. What that means is someone is giving you prompts to get you to a state of relaxation and then to a state of mindfulness.

Firstly, you are guided to look at your breath and concentrate solely on your breathing. In doing that you are guided to relax all parts of your body one by one. If you feel any parts tensing up again you focus your breath on those parts and the tension should ease away. The instructor stops talking, you feel completely relaxed and from here your only concern is the pattern of your breathing. Naturally, thoughts will come into your mind but in time you learn to allow them to float out again. And that is the start of achieving mindfulness.

One exercise we were given was to try using mindfulness as we go about doing simple day to day tasks. For example, if you’re making your first cup of tea of the morning, instead of thinking about the stack of ironing in the basket, the weeds outgrowing the roses in the garden, the fact that your boss has put you on lates again or whether you’ll get a report out in time at work, you solely concentrate on the process in hand. For example: Fill the kettle and think of nothing else. Put the bag in the cup and push the picture of the linen basket out of your mind – and so on. You get the idea.

I did manage to do this quite well at one stage and I have to say that I found it calming. I only wish I had carried on. Especially on a week like this when there have been a few upsets around me and, without a coping strategy, I can feel the tension building in my shoulders again. Maybe it’s time to allow a touch of mindfulness back into my life. In fact we could all do with some couldn’t we?

ByAnxious Minds

About Yoga

Yoga was developed in India at least three thousand years ago, and is a discipline that uses breath control, meditation and physical exercises. There are number of things about yoga that make it particular appealing, chiefly because it helps to promote mental and physical well being. The purpose of the philosophy and technique is to achieve a heightened awareness, and ultimately, to attain spiritual enlightenment.

First, there are some basic principles about yoga that are an integral part of its teachings. These come mainly from the Bhagavad Gita, which is one of the primary religious texts outlining ways to achieve liberation from one is worldly worries and desires.

There are many different types of yoga, and one of the most popular forms in the West is hatha yoga, which focuses on strengthening, toning and relaxation. Most yoga exercises focus on proper positioning of the body in various postures. One of the high points about yoga is its benefit to overall body health. Daily practice improves strength, suppleness, and circulation. It promotes relaxation and increases range of motion, which helps to reduce the likely hood of muscle strain. Many people use it as a primary source of exercise, and others use it complementarity and such as with running, to help strengthen a host of different muscles.

Yogis believe that breath is the bridge between mind and body. Pranayama are specific exercises in which the person breathes deeply, concentrating on the breath as it enters and exits the nostrils. This puts the person at ease and allows their muscles to warm up gradually. This focus on breathing allows deep muscle relaxation, releases tension, and induces a tranquil state.

Yoga can be especially useful to older people and those with disabilities who are recovering from an illness. However, anyone can benefit from the slow, gentle exercises and the positive effect they have on hormonal balance, alleviating depression, and increasing strength and flexibility. One of the best things about yoga is that it is accessible to people of all ages and physical fitness levels.

One of the important differences between yoga and a typical workout exercise is an emphasis on process. While many exercise programs encourage you to push and strain every muscle in your body, to eradicate the enegative things in your body, the positive thing about yoga is that it has an entirely different approach. It focuses on developing awareness of the body as it is, accepting and working within its limits.

www.anxiousminds.co.uk

ByAnxious Minds

Chase Away the Blues with Yoga

Yoga is a great disposition enhancer and it does it naturally. Any kind of exercise releases hormones that help ease the stress that often leads to the blues or outright depression. Activity keeps your mind far from negative thoughts and allows you to gain insight into dilemmas in your life. People who are depressed or down often lack the stimulus to exercise. It doesn’t take nearly as much effort to do a Yoga routine as it does to work out to a video or drive to the gym. A word of warning; if you experience more than just the occasional bout depression and feel down for more than two weeks at a time, you should seek professional help. They may feel that you need treatment or therapy, and proper exercise.

Very often people who are depressed frequently lack the concentration to stop and try to disconnect themselves from their thoughts. Yoga is meditation in movement so it is easier to move your mind away from depressing thoughts. Yoga’s focus on balance can also help you bring back your mental strength.

Yoga has a clear-cut connection between mind, body, and spirit that no other form of exercise or meditation can attain on its own. Negative thoughts can keep us from experiencing our vital inner nature. Doubt, hopelessness, despair, apathy and either sleeping too much or not enough are all signs of depression. Yoga is designed to bring you closer to your inner self; it then is only natural that it can help with some of the symptoms of depression.

Certain postures can influence your mood and allow depression to end but one special Asana can’t cure depression. The Asanas assist in increasing your lung capacity allowing more oxygen to reach all the affected parts of your body including your mood. Asana postures can help depleted energy levels and sluggishness. You should ask your Yoga instructor to help you and suggest postures that would best assist you to balance your moods.

The practice of yoga calms the nervous system and allows you to comprehend the link between your mind and emotions. They can both be used to help each other. As breathing is an important part of Yoga, it can also help you to limit anxiety, calm your thoughts, and help you concentrate on positive energy rather than negative.

Any style of Yoga can help you exile feelings of depression. It may not be physically demanding but you will feel so much better at the end of your session. Remember, if you have a severe depressive episode; seek advice from with a professional. Consult with your Doctor before starting to practice yoga to be sure there is no conflict with any treatment you may be undergoing. If you want to try a Yoga routine specifically for depression, find a teacher who can create a personal routine for you. Yoga teachers have been extensively trained for this purpose and know which positions that are the most suitable for remedial purposes.

www.anxiousminds.co.uk

ByAnxious Minds

Chair Yoga

What is chair yoga?

Chair yoga has increasingly become popular among people who can’t really practice the complicated body postures of traditional yoga. These people include those with physical disabilities and senior citizens, who have become interested in doing yoga but want it the milder way. Chair yoga is not a formal type of yoga. It is a gentler form of yoga which is done through sitting in a chair or using a chair as support whilst standing. This gives the option of doing a series of less complicated yoga poses.

Classes.

Senior care centres, disabled rehabilitation centres and some hospitals do chair yoga classes. It is also frequently recommended by some health professionals as a helpful tool for physical therapy. Chair yoga also gives benefits like oxygenating the mind and body for greater productivity, and also tones muscles. However, not just anybody can teach chair yoga. One has to be a certified chair yoga instructor, as it involves the essential know-how of dealing with people who have health conditions. It also entails knowledge of the appropriate chair yoga for them.

One such training for chair yoga certification is offered by Lakshmi Voelker. Voelker specialises in certifying individuals with her chair yoga programs called The Sitting Mountain Series. This chair yoga certification program is of particular interest to some healthcare professionals. Occupational therapists, physical therapists, clinical social workers, and registered nurses, count chair Yoga as important.

Who can benefit?

It is advantageous for people working with children, seniors,  the wheelchair bound, or anybody with difficulties that prevents them from getting on the floor. Lakshmi the chair yoga certification program works with senior housing facilities, MS, Departments of Education, as well as other like organisations.

Another centre who offers chair yoga certification is the Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health. This five day chair yoga certification program is perfect for many people. Yoga practitioners, yoga teachers, healthcare providers,  those who work with people with disabilities, and seniors can all benefit. Participants of the program learn to adapt classical yoga poses to the chair and enables would-be certified chair yoga teachers to teach a one-hour chair yoga class with comprehensive information and confidence to their varied audience.

Chair yoga certification is essential for  people who want to teach chair yoga. Complete knowledge and awareness provides better and more effective delivery of the benefits of chair yoga to their students. This knowledge also ensures that qualified chair yoga instructors are recognised and respected for of their expertise.

www.anxiousminds.co.uk

ByAnxious Minds

6 Simple Breathing Exercises To Deal With Stress

Breathing is something we all do during our lifetime. We all know we are going to die if we are not breathing. Breathing is a reflex action done by our body to provide the flow of oxygen around the body to the vital organs.

Wikipedia, the online encyclopedia, describes humans breathe between 12 and 20 times per minute, with children breathing faster than adults.

Babies may breathe as much as 40 times per minute. Adults normally breathe about 500-700ml of air at a time. An average 14-year old takes around 30,000 breaths per day.
However, we can control our breathing. We can be more relaxed by breathing in and out so deeply. The more we allow our body to be filled by deep breathing, the less stress we place on our body and mind.

The more we practice our deep and controlled breathing, the more natural it becomes and we can call on it at any time of day to help us through those tired or stressed out moments.

With all the problems we have — either we feel stressed out at work, or at the end of a long hard day and we can’t sleep, or if we just want a few minutes to our self — we will find this simple breathing exercise really beneficial.

Here are some steps to do breathing exercise:

1. You can lie down, sit down or stand up as long as you are comfortable. Breathe in slowly through your nose to the count of four. Breathe very deep until all your body feels expanded.

2. Hold on that deep breath for four counts, and then exhale slowly through the mouth to a count of eight.

3. Repeat the breathing in and right down so your tummy expands. Hold on to it and then exhaling nine more times.

4. You can breathe deeper once you get used to the above steps by leave one hand on your stomach and place the other lightly across the chest. Breathe right down so your tummy expands

5. When it can’t go any further, breathe in some more and fill the tops of your lungs. Inhalations and exhalation are the same lengths, eight counts each, without holding in between.

6. When you exhale, let the old air out from your chest than from your tummy. So, you are going to be relaxed.

www.anxiousminds.co.uk

ByAnxious Minds

4 Secrets to Finding the Right Beginner Yoga Class for You

When you are new to Yoga you are probably going to be uncertain as to what to expect when you first enter a beginner Yoga Class on your first day. Most people are uncertain about what they should even be looking for in a beginner Yoga class, so this article will let you in on the four secrets to finding the right class for you.

Secret Number One: Decide on what you want to achieve before choosing a style.

The number of different reasons for taking up Yoga is usually at least as high as the number of new people in a Yoga class. Broadly people will be looking for one of three things – physical health, mental health or spiritual health. All three are important and all three are realistic goals in a Yoga class. Whatever it is you are trying to achieve through Yoga there will be a class and style that is suitable for you. You can research in a library, online or even by asking various Yogi and this will hep you find the Yoga that will get the best result for you.

It’s worth actually setting some solid goals and many newcomers are surprised at how willing a Yoga instructor is to talk over these goals with them and discuss whether they are realistic or an alternative may be better suited.

Secret Number Two: Join a class-by-class program

These are sometimes referred to as drop in classes, or pay as you go. These are a good way of getting a feel for Yoga. There will be a regular turnover of other students in the classes and the contrasting level will mean the instructor will keep the classes at a relatively mild level and give everyone a taste of many different aspects of Yoga.

The advantage of this method is of course that you are not committed to an expensive series of classes and you can get a taster for Yoga and see what types of Yoga interest you. You will also quickly learn whether the goals you set earlier are realistic for you, or even too low and need expanding upon.

Your next step will be to choose a series of classes in the areas that you found most suitable from the drop in classes. These classes will build on each other from week to week and you may find yourself behind if you miss a week.

Secret Number Three: Ensure that you are being taught by someone who knows what they are doing.

Surprisingly enough considering the relatively low intensity and the many physical benefits, Yoga has begun to regularly show up on the statistics for sports injuries. Two key causes are identified. Firstly students pushing themselves too fast too soon, and secondly instructors with inadequate training or appreciation of the individual level of their students(large classes are sometimes to blame for this).

When you are considering a new class don’t be embarrassed to ask your Yoga instructor what their qualifications and background are. Many ‘instructors have nothing more than a three day training course in ‘gym yoga’ and many people put this in the ‘enough knowledge to be dangerous category’. Traditionally a student would train for many years under a guru before they would be considered fit to pass on even the simplest of Yoga techniques to another novice.

The Yoga Alliance is a United States organisation that features a register of teaches who have completed ‘appropriate’ training. This means having completed courses that meet a certain standard. A nice rule to work by is that less than 200 hours of instruction would mean a part time Yoga education.

Secret Number Four: Be aware of hidden costs.

An unpleasant surprise that can put people right off Yoga is turning up to the first class and finding that there are expenses that they haven’t allowed for. Some studio’s require each student to have their own mat, a special strap or other props. Some classes will work through a book which you are obliged to buy and some classes will have a dress code ranging from specific colours to specific articles of clothing. Being unaware of any of these things and being refused your first class because of them can be very off-putting.

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ByAnxious Minds

3 Common Mistakes by Yoga Newcomers

Whenever we start something new we have a certain feeling of trepidation and uncertainty of the unknown and in most cases it is completely unfounded and we get on with things very quickly and easily. Sometimes it isn’t and a simple little thing can cause us to have an entirely negative first impression and perhaps even never want to try that activity or pastime again.

Yoga has so many health benefits, on both a physical and spiritual level, that it would be a tragedy for anyone to miss out on them because they made a silly avoidable mistake on their first day. With that in mind this article addresses the 3 most common mistakes of new Yogi, and how to make sure they don’t happen to you.

Mistake One: Not knowing what you want from Yoga.

The reality is that there are numerous different styles and forms of Yoga and each has it’s different attractions. Ask yourself what it was about Yoga in general that attracted you and then you can investigate a style that caters more specifically to that. You may like to set goals, be they physical, mental or spiritual.

If you do then it’s a good idea to discuss them with the instructor of your class before you begin. Yoga instructors are usually very approachable and happy to talk about their passion. They will be able to talk to you about your goals for the class and let you know if you are being realistic, aiming too high or too low. Make sure you goal includes a time frame so it becomes something that is measurable.

Mistake Two: Jumping in Feet First.

Having decided that they will give this Yoga thing a try many people take a running leap and jump in to a 12 month stage by stage class. These classes are usually an upfront payment arrangement and progress from one level to the next as the weeks progress. They are a fantastic way of learning Yoga and becoming very good at it, but it’s quite possibly you will choose a class that is not ideal for you.

The best way around this is to join a Yoga beginner class, also known as a drop in class. If you do these classes for a few weeks you will notice a high turnover of students as new people join and old people move on. These classes are designed to give you a very broad feel for the different types of Yoga. The level of the students in the class usually varies greatly so you can expect the instructor to keep the classes quite tame. The other key benefit of doing this is that the classes are pay as you go so there is no big financial outlay for you while you decide the type and style of yoga that best suits you. You are also not obliged to attend every class. With the longer courses you can fall behind quickly if you miss a week or two in a row. With the pay as you go classes you will find that while each class is different the level stays quite low to cater for the newer people joining in.

Mistake Three: Choosing the wrong teacher.

Traditionally a Yogi had to be an apprentice to a skilled Guru for many years before he could teach even the simplest of Yoga technique. Nowadays a 3-day course over a long weekend is considered enough by some people. There is a big difference in what you will achieve depending on the skills and abilities of the person teaching you. Yoga is starting to make a regular appearance on the sports injury list and a large reason for this is instructors who have been taught just enough to be dangerous. A qualified teacher won’t necessarily be fantastic and an unqualified teacher won’t necessarily be terrible – but the odds are certainly cast in that direction, so it’s a good idea to check your instructors background and qualifications before you begin studying with them.

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ByAnxious Minds

Anusara Yoga

Anusara Yoga is an inspiring and heart-oriented yoga, at the same time as being grounded on the Universal Principles of Alignment for the outer and inner body. It is an exceptional, therapeutic way of Hatha Yoga wherein the artistic expression of the heart mysteriously blends with biomechanicsí scientific principles. Anusara Yoga was established and formed by John Friend.

The name Anusara is taken from a verse in Kularnava Tantra, which means ìflowing with grace in following your heart going with the flow. The verse reads in Sanskrit as Ishakti-symbolized-anusarena sishyoíanugraham-arhatii which means, through walking into the stream of the divine graceís descent into one’s heart, a sincere seeker is made worthy and enclosed in the grace that nurtures and sustains their every action.

Anusara yoga was founded in 1997, and is currently among the most well-known and rapidly growing yoga styles all around the globe, with more than one-thousand-two-hundred affiliated teachers, as well as a hundred thousand students worldwide. Anusara yoga classes can now be found all through the United States, Mexico, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Japan, Europe, and increasingly growing in a lot of other areas of the world.

Anusara yoga has also been drawing media attention internationally including a cover story in the Yoga Journal on 2004, U.S. is national news, as well as magazines and newspapers all through the United Kingdom, Europe, and North America. Its remarkable popularity is mostly owed to its uplifting philosophy, symbolised by a celebration of the heart looking for the good in every person and everything.

Accordingly, students with all stages of ability and experience of yoga are honoured for the unique differences, talents, and limitations that they have. This life-affirming dream places the foundation for yoga system where joy and harmony of tightly united community revel. Anusara yoga is not only deemed as an elegant system of the principles of alignment and non-dual philosophy but is also a superb group of highly trained yoga teachers and high-spirited students. The community feels its tightness of family connection, yet the laxity of a happy group of bohemian artists.

As a yoga community, it is well systemized and organised. However, it still gives a strong emphasis on individuality and creative freedom. Everyone bonds Anusara yoga is understood alliance to its spiritual principles of Anusara philosophy, like celebrating beauty in every diversity, honouring Divine creative liberty in every being, and truthfulness.